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What's the right type of project?

Creating or joining an open source project that helps your business and attracts a community of experts is not that easy: the open source project space is somewhat crowded today, and those experts are busy people.

Judging from the Apache Software Foundation's achievements in the last ten years, infrastructure projects have by far the highest success rate. If you can reduce (part of) your problem to a generalised software infrastructure that appeals to a wide range of software developers, those experts will see value in joining the project. Apache Hadoop is another very successful example of software architects and developers from different companies joining forces to solve a hard problem (large scale distributed computing) in a way that can benefit a whole industry. On a smaller scale, Apache Jackrabbit , one of the projects in which my employer is very active, brings together many experts from the content management world, to solve the problem of storing, searching and retrieving multimedia content efficiently. Those types of software modules are used as central infrastructure components in systems that share a similar architecture, while offering very different services to their end users.

Projects closer to the user interface level are often harder to manage in an open group, partly because they are often more specific to the exact problem that they solve, and also because it is often hard for people coming from different companies and cultural backgrounds to agree on the colour of the proverbial bike shed. An infrastructure software project can be well defined by an industry specification (such as JCR in Jackrabbit's case), and/or by automated test suites. These are usually much easier to agree on than on user interface mock-ups.

Where next?

I hope to have convinced you that open source projects provide the best feedback loop for innovative software. As a next step, I would recommend getting involved in open source projects that matter to you. There are many ways to contribute, from reporting bugs in a useful way, to writing tutorials, contributing new modules or extensions, or simply reporting on your use of the software in various environments.

Contributing, in any small or big way, to a successful open source project is the best way to see this high-quality feedback loop in action. You might also try to use the open source ways of working inside your company, to create or improve your own high-quality "innovation feedback loop".

I cannot pretend to have the definitive answer to the "how do you select and execute the right ideas to innovate?" question. When it comes to software, however, the fast and high-quality feedback loop that open source projects provide, in my opinion, is the best selection tool.

1 Chesbrough, H.W. (2003). Open Innovation: The new imperative for creating and profiting from technology. Boston: Harvard Business School Press

See also:

Betrand Delacretaz TransferSummit presenter Bertrand Delacretaz works as a senior developer in Day Software's R&D group, using open source tools to create world-class content management systems. Bertrand is a member of the Apache Software Foundation and is active in many projects there.

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